Not my president?

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By Heather Walton

I have heard many people say that “Insert Person’s Name I Didn’t Vote For Here” isn’t my president! I have a simple question: Is that an option? And, if so, what are the potential repercussions?

So, if you’re an American, especially if you’re a Christian, and your candidate didn’t win, and even if the candidate that is inaugurated is diametrically opposed to your most closely held beliefs, do you get to say that that person isn’t your president? I would submit that, in this case, you have some choices:

  1. Move to another country. This is impractical for most of us, and truth be told, you would be hard-pressed to find a better one, even in these dark times.
  2. Join or start a movement to overthrow the government. This one is provided for in our Constitution. I find this option difficult to weigh, because, as the saying goes, “Often the devil you know is better than the devil you don’t know.” Would a civil war, or an insurrection, return our government to the ideals of our founding fathers? Probably not. It would probably hasten our downward spiral into socialism and the accomplishment of the U.N. 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, a lofty-sounding cover for elite management of the entire world.
  3. Work as a responsible citizen to try to enact change at the local level, perhaps joining with grassroots supporters of a return to Biblical values. Pray, raise your family well, and serve your neighbors.

I believe that America’s days are numbered, and like those Hebrew exiles to ancient Babylon, we are called to be good citizens who support the valid aspects of our government while choosing not to participate in those that go against God’s will. Consider Daniel and his three young friends who petitioned their supervisor not to be required to eat the meat and drink the wine sacrificed to the Babylonian idols. Consider Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego, who refused to bow to Nebuchadnezzar’s statue. Consider Daniel, who continued to pray openly, in spite of being ordered to only pray to the king. These acts all had the potential to carry the death penalty, yet these brave young men stood against the culture and the government. Consider Esther, who risked her life to go to the king without being called; this act saved her people from certain death. Consider Nehemiah, who dared to appear mournful in front of the king, and who boldly petitioned for leave to rebuild the walls of Jerusalem. In each case, the exiles risked everything, and brought deliverance to their people and glory to the one true God.

While there are obvious parallels, there is a major difference between us and the exiled Hebrews: We are exiles in our own land. That is difficult to accept. It is heartbreaking to watch the overturning of Biblical values. For example, in less than an hour, we will have an administration that is willing to sacrifice so many precious unborn American lives on the altars of sexual revolution, power, and money. This is tragic, yet we, the church, have allowed this to transpire over time. How can we expect a nation with Molech’s altars, soaked with the blood of so many innocent babies, to prosper and enjoy freedom?

“Their feet run to evil, and they are swift to shed innocent blood; their thoughts are thoughts of iniquity; desolation and destruction are in their highways. The way of peace they do not know, and there is no justice in their paths; they have made their roads crooked; no one who treads on them knows peace.”

Isaiah 59:7-8 ESV

And that is just one example of how America has gone astray, and how the church has failed to constrain iniquity.

Church, we have earned this president, and it honestly doesn’t matter who actually won this election — because at noon, Joe Biden will be sworn in, and he will be our president, whether or not we agree. We might as well use our energy to fulfill the Great Commission and the Great Commandment, because though we don’t know what’s ahead for our nation, we do know what’s ahead for those who neglect to place their trust in Jesus Christ as Lord, and the consequences are eternal. In the process, we might deliver our nation as well. But even if we don’t, like those three who defied the king in Babylon, we must choose not to serve the false gods of the culture, even as we remain citizens of this land.

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