Tag Archives: Christian living

No hurry and nothing to fear!

By Heather Walton

In a day where fear abounds, and where Christians see certain persecution looming on the horizon of history, in a day where people seek manmade solutions and develop timelines and deadlines, the Lord encourages us to be steadfast and to trust Him, no matter how deceptive the narrative and how dark the winter.

There is but one man in whom we should place our ultimate trust. One man who sits on the throne. One who knows truth. One who ultimately orchestrates.

His name is Jesus, and He never fails, never disappoints, never abandons, never lies, and never surrenders. He is the only one worthy of our praise, our adoration, and our worship.

For to us a child is born,

    to us a son is given;

and the government shall be upon his shoulder,

    and his name shall be called

Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God,

    Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace.

Of the increase of his government and of peace

    there will be no end,

on the throne of David and over his kingdom,

    to establish it and to uphold it

with justice and with righteousness

    from this time forth and forevermore.

The zeal of the Lord of hosts will do this.

Isaiah 9:6-7 ESV

When we place our hope in human governors and governments, or in media, or in authorities, we misplace our trust. Jesus rules over all, and someday that will be evident to all, but today, on this side of eternity, that is not yet apparent. For many, all appeared lost on Jan. 20. For others, all appeared gained. Yet only the King of Kings and Lord of Lords knows the full truth, and only He can redeem humanity from the curse brought on by sinful men who do the devil’s bidding.

There are some who await President Trump’s return on a white horse to set all things right. He is not going to. Whether he reappears in the pages of our human chronicle of history remains to be seen. Whether he will rescue our Constitution or rise up as the personification of evil also remains as yet history unwritten. The point is that too many have put too much hope in this man, and those who have need to repent and let God show Himself to be our only Savior. While Trump may yet return and do great things, he is not God. He can not ultimately rescue humanity from what ails us most — sin! It is not even fair to expect the things many have expected from this man.

Brothers and sisters in Christ, I believe we are coming into a time of intense, worldwide persecution of Christians. We need to be ready. We will be cancelled, demonized, misrepresented, falsely accused, imprisoned, and perhaps even killed. The church is currently being refined and many are walking away. Perhaps you think I’m going a little overboard, but did you ever think churches would close, here in America, as a result of government orders? Did you ever think Christians and Christian textbook publishers would be blamed for a Capitol “insurrection?” Worse is coming. But ultimately, this should not worry us.

“Nothing is hurried. There is no confusion, no disturbance. The enemy is at the door, yet God prepares a table, and the Christian sits and eats as if everything were in perfect peace. Oh the peace that Jehovah gives His people, even in the midst of the most trying circumstances.”

Charles Spurgeon, Treasury of David

When we know our eternity is settled, and we are right with our Creator, we can experience peace that passes all understanding, and even if we are called to face a martyr’s death, we can be at perfect peace. Take courage, redemption is just around the corner!

Not my president?

Photo by Andrew Neel on Pexels.com

By Heather Walton

I have heard many people say that “Insert Person’s Name I Didn’t Vote For Here” isn’t my president! I have a simple question: Is that an option? And, if so, what are the potential repercussions?

So, if you’re an American, especially if you’re a Christian, and your candidate didn’t win, and even if the candidate that is inaugurated is diametrically opposed to your most closely held beliefs, do you get to say that that person isn’t your president? I would submit that, in this case, you have some choices:

  1. Move to another country. This is impractical for most of us, and truth be told, you would be hard-pressed to find a better one, even in these dark times.
  2. Join or start a movement to overthrow the government. This one is provided for in our Constitution. I find this option difficult to weigh, because, as the saying goes, “Often the devil you know is better than the devil you don’t know.” Would a civil war, or an insurrection, return our government to the ideals of our founding fathers? Probably not. It would probably hasten our downward spiral into socialism and the accomplishment of the U.N. 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, a lofty-sounding cover for elite management of the entire world.
  3. Work as a responsible citizen to try to enact change at the local level, perhaps joining with grassroots supporters of a return to Biblical values. Pray, raise your family well, and serve your neighbors.

I believe that America’s days are numbered, and like those Hebrew exiles to ancient Babylon, we are called to be good citizens who support the valid aspects of our government while choosing not to participate in those that go against God’s will. Consider Daniel and his three young friends who petitioned their supervisor not to be required to eat the meat and drink the wine sacrificed to the Babylonian idols. Consider Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego, who refused to bow to Nebuchadnezzar’s statue. Consider Daniel, who continued to pray openly, in spite of being ordered to only pray to the king. These acts all had the potential to carry the death penalty, yet these brave young men stood against the culture and the government. Consider Esther, who risked her life to go to the king without being called; this act saved her people from certain death. Consider Nehemiah, who dared to appear mournful in front of the king, and who boldly petitioned for leave to rebuild the walls of Jerusalem. In each case, the exiles risked everything, and brought deliverance to their people and glory to the one true God.

While there are obvious parallels, there is a major difference between us and the exiled Hebrews: We are exiles in our own land. That is difficult to accept. It is heartbreaking to watch the overturning of Biblical values. For example, in less than an hour, we will have an administration that is willing to sacrifice so many precious unborn American lives on the altars of sexual revolution, power, and money. This is tragic, yet we, the church, have allowed this to transpire over time. How can we expect a nation with Molech’s altars, soaked with the blood of so many innocent babies, to prosper and enjoy freedom?

“Their feet run to evil, and they are swift to shed innocent blood; their thoughts are thoughts of iniquity; desolation and destruction are in their highways. The way of peace they do not know, and there is no justice in their paths; they have made their roads crooked; no one who treads on them knows peace.”

Isaiah 59:7-8 ESV

And that is just one example of how America has gone astray, and how the church has failed to constrain iniquity.

Church, we have earned this president, and it honestly doesn’t matter who actually won this election — because at noon, Joe Biden will be sworn in, and he will be our president, whether or not we agree. We might as well use our energy to fulfill the Great Commission and the Great Commandment, because though we don’t know what’s ahead for our nation, we do know what’s ahead for those who neglect to place their trust in Jesus Christ as Lord, and the consequences are eternal. In the process, we might deliver our nation as well. But even if we don’t, like those three who defied the king in Babylon, we must choose not to serve the false gods of the culture, even as we remain citizens of this land.

What Is Law?: A Case for Christian Civil Disobedience

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By Heather Walton

We need to follow the law! We shouldn’t disobey the authorities! How can you call yourself a Christian, yet choose not to follow the law?

I don’t disagree with these statements, but I think that often they demonstrate a lack of understanding of the nature of law.

According to William Blackstone, who authored Commentaries on the Laws of England, an inspiration for American philosophy, explained the differences in Natural Law, Revealed Law, and Municipal Law: Natural Law is that which is apparent to everyone, everywhere, for all times, according to conscience. Revealed Law is uniquely available in the Scriptures. Municipal or civil law is man-made and enforced by government.

“Man, considered as a creature, must necessarily be subject to the laws of his Creator … it is necessary that he should, in all points, conform to his Maker’s will. This will of his maker is called the law of nature … This law of nature, dictated by God himself, is … superior in obligation to any other. It is binding over all the globe, in all countries, and at all times; no human laws are of any validity if contrary to this.”

William Blackstone, Commentaries on the Laws of england: Book the first.

Simply put, if civil law contradicts natural or revealed law, it is not a valid law and we are not bound to follow it. Blackstone posited that there were three absolute rights: life, liberty, and property. Our founding fathers used this phrase, yet altered the last to be the “pursuit of happiness.”

Likewise, John Locke, believed civil laws were not to contradict God’s laws:

“Human laws are measures in respect of men whose actions they must direct, howbeit such measures they are as have also their higher rules to be measured by, which rules are two — the laws of God and the laws of Nature; so that laws human must be made according to the general laws of Nature, and without contradiction to any positive law of Scripture, otherwise they are ill made.”

John Locke, Second Treatise on Civil Government (An essay concerning the True Extent and End of Civil Government), XI: 136, FN2; quoting Richard Hooker, Ecclesiastical Polity, 1, iii, 9, cf. Locke, Second Treatise, II: 6: XI: 142.

We have laws today that go against God’s laws. For example, allowances for abortion and infanticide, as well as laws allowing for polygamy and same-sex marriage violate both natural and revealed law, and therefore are unjust laws. Christians are justified in not following these laws. If a baker refused to make a wedding cake for a same-sex couple or a minister declines to officiate their wedding, they are justified before God. If a medical professional goes against state law and performs heroic measures on a baby not considered fit to live, or if a bank refuses to open an account for an abortion clinic, they are justified. If a country mandates that families have only one baby, and a couple hides a subsequent pregnancy, they are justified. Many, though not all, Christians would see these as obvious conclusions; however, there are mandates, emergency orders, and laws that do not seem so clear to Christ-followers.

Consider the case of churches being told to shut down or to limit services or sacraments, or not to sing, in order to preserve the public health, even though these practices are mandated in Scripture. What about restaurants and other businesses that are told they must shut down or greatly limit capacity, yet Scripture tells us that if we are to provide for our families? What about the fact that Scripture tells us to avoid favoritism, yet rulers are favoring big businesses and certain industries while disfavoring small businesses and comparable industries? How about the requirements to wear a mask or, eventually, to take a vaccine, for the good of the populace? These issues have sharply divided the country, including the church.

If the German Christians would have discerned the path that Hitler was taking them down. I certainly hope they would have resisted, that they would have engaged in civil disobedience.

We may not be dealing with things that seem so serious as they did when Naziism gained power, but we need to examine whether seemingly innocuous measures could give way to tyranny, totalitarianism, and full-scale depravity. One thing Hitler did was to get control of the press in order to restrict information and direct the narrative. He also controlled education, which is imperative when trying to usher in totalitarianism. Today we are witnessing a complete takeover of mainstream media and public education, one which is intended to drive public thought and to shame divergent thinking into private corners of society. Even in the church, we are seeing an ideological takeover by Marxist proponents who advocate social justice over biblical justice.

Wholesale gaslighting is creating cowardice and shame, as those who stand for truth are painted as bigoted, uncaring, unintelligent, and combative. Whether one questions the narrative of social justice, coronavirus policies, governmental authority, gender identity, or socialism itself, he is assumed to have ill motives and to reject science. It’s enough to make one question his sanity at times! And what’s more, the progressive ideology by nature evolves, so that what was once acceptable no longer is.

“You can never be sure when those in power will come after you as a villain for having said or done something that was perfectly fine the day before. And the consequences for violating the new taboos are extreme, including losing your livelihood and having your reputation ruined forever.

People are becoming instant pariahs for having expressed a politically incorrect opinion, or in some other way provoking a progressive mob, which amplifies its scapegoating through social and conventional media. Under the guise of “diversity,” “inclusivity,” “equity,” and other egalitarian jargon, the Left creates powerful mechanisms for controlling thought and discourse and marginalizes dissenters as evil.”

Rod Dreher, Live Not By Lies

We must remember that most people whom history regards as heroic were not esteemed by the majority at the time. Isn’t the essence of heroism the willingness to do that which the majority refuses? In a culture that praises mediocrity, in which “everyone gets a trophy,” we laud many as heroes who are simply doing what is expected; doing what’s right and noble and difficult is no longer the norm, but the exception, making ordinary people appear heroic. However, when we ponder those whom history holds as heroes, we must consider a higher standard:

HE’ROnoun [Latin heros; Gr. a demigod.]

1. A man of distinguished valor, intrepidity or enterprise in danger; as a hero in arms.

2. A great, illustrious or extraordinary person; as a hero in learning. [Little used.]

Noah Webster, American Dictionary of the English Language, 1828

One needs to be distinguished or extraordinary in order to qualify as a hero. During the American Revolution, those who were civilly disobedient to King George were considered overly idealistic at best and sinful at worst, yet they believed that they were doing what was right in fighting tyranny. They did it for their fellow man. They did it for future generations. They did it for us. Are we willing to look back through the pages of history at those flawed but true heroes and say, “Thanks, but no thanks. We don’t want the liberty you bought us. We’d rather have safety, health, and prosperity.” I sure hope not!

Taking it a step further, are we willing to look back 2000 years and say to Jesus Christ, who bought us with His blood, “Thanks, but no thanks!”?

“It was for freedom that Christ set us free; therefore keep standing firm and do not be subject again to a yoke of slavery.”

Galatians 5:1 ESV

The Apostle Paul was speaking out against legalism. He was telling them that they should not submit to rules that people said were required for salvation. Christ alone holds our salvation in His hands. Those who say that the social justice gospel will save us are heretics. Those who say that the humanist, socialist agenda will save us are apostate. Those who say we must obey a government when it mandates the giving up of fundamental freedoms misuse Scripture to validate their erroneous perspective.

There is clearly a dark agenda at play, one that has progressed for the past 200 years. The itinerary is planned by Satan himself. Let us not forget that he masquerades as an angel of light (2 Corinthians 11:14). The plan is to get all to submit to Satan’s humanistic agenda, which is to get us to think we must be in control, that God doesn’t have the answers, and may in fact, not even exist. When men like Charles Darwin, Friedrich Nietsche, Karl Marx, and John Dewey contributed their respective godless thoughts to the socialist equation, they did so in defiance of God, and they were pawns in Satan’s chess game. Today we are seeing the outcome of the devil’s false humanistic gospel — chaos, rampant sin, and the discarding of common sense and virtue.

As Christians, are we truly to sit by and watch this take place and even participate as it does? I think not! Aren’t we called to rescue the perishing, to light up the darkness, to warn of coming destruction? If, in doing so, we have to violate civil law, then so be it.

This world is passing away. We cannot save it. But we can, by the power of Jesus Christ, share His salvation with others. May we do so until we no longer have breath. May we consider hell so offensive that we would not will even one soul to go there without first having heard the Gospel preached and having seen it lived. We cannot entirely serve Caesar and God in this time, and may we never pick the former, or it’s proposed benefits, over the latter. May we say with Queen Esther,

“I will go to the king, though it is against the law, and if I perish, I perish.”

Esther 4:16b ESV (emphasis added)

COVID in KY: What do these numbers mean?

By Heather Walton

I examined the statistics for Kentucky on the CDC’s death statistics and made some observations from the following data:

This chart is part of the data found at https://data.cdc.gov/NCHS/Weekly-Counts-of-Deaths-by-State-and-Select-Causes/muzy-jte6/data

1. I calculated the actual Kentucky deaths from week 15 to week 42 of 2019 and 2020, because that period reflects the beginning of the COVID deaths and allows for enough time to have passed that the data for 2020 should be complete. In doing so, I got these numbers for Kentucky: 2019: 25,209 total deaths; 2020: 27,744 total deaths. That means 2,535 more deaths for Kentucky during that period, accounting for about 93 deaths per week. That could be statistically significant, but we do need to control for other factors.

2. I calculated the deaths by natural causes from the same periods and for 2019, there were 22,933, and for 2020, there were 24,919. This means there were 1,926 more deaths by natural causes, which brings the above number to 71 deaths per week, 22 less weekly than the total. This means there were 2,276 unnatural deaths for that period in 2019, and 2,825 unnatural deaths in 2020.

It is important to investigate the effects of the pandemic and its mitigation measures on unnatural deaths, because causation and/or correlation there could be evidence that lockdowns are at least partially counterproductive. Also, if you make the case that civil unrest is unrelated to the lockdowns, then those figures should be considered independently. And if you make the case that lockdowns are causal, at least partially, to civil unrest, then the cure could be partially responsible for continuing cases and deaths due to the virus.

3. According to data from the U.S. Census Bureau and World Population Review, the population of KY increased by 32,017 between July 2019 and the present, which is a .35% increase. We should expect rising death rates with rising population, and we should expect the death rates to outnumber the population growth because of the aging population.

4. According to scholarly research, mortality has been disproportionate in skilled nursing facilities, with around 34% of the deaths occurring in nursing homes. In fact, Dr. Steven Stack said during the November 30 Governor’s briefing that two thirds of Kentucky COVID deaths have been in nursing homes. This, of course, is tragic, but does not support lockdowns; it may actually build a case against them.

I believe it is important to think critically and have productive dialogue regarding the issues of our day. We must not rely on others’ opinions, but should do our own research and ask thoughtful questions before coming to conclusions.

In doing so, I’m not trying to downplay anyone’s pain or personal experience with the virus; on the contrary, it is crucial to examine the impact of COVID-19 from multiple perspectives. I have repeatedly been told that, if I had experienced the devastation of this virus, I would think and behave differently. To that I say, is there anyone who hasn’t experienced the devastation of this virus? And why do some people limit the negative impact to catching the virus or deaths attributed to the virus? It goes so much deeper than that:

Consider the impact on people’s livelihoods: In Louisville alone, hundreds of businesses have closed this year. Many workers have been laid off. Our state economy has been devastated. You might say that this isn’t as important as the loss of human life. In fact, it does sound like a reasonable concession to make for the sake of so many potential lives lost. However, when we consider that perhaps the numbers are being over-dramatized, it should make us pause. Even if they weren’t, we need to look at the short and long-term consequences of this huge economic loss. Indeed, it could result in loss of life, and definitely results in loss of quality of life.

Depression and anxiety are on the rise. This is a major consequence of the lockdowns. Many children and adolescents are suffering from the lack of true social interaction and the uncertainty perpetuated by these mitigation measures and the media attention given to the pandemic. Unemployment also contributes to mental health, as does isolation. And what about the elderly who are not allowed visitors, even in the final moments of their lives? It seems downright unreasonable that the government has even mandated that people die alone.

Students are receiving less-than-ideal education, because non-traditional instruction (NTI) is not cutting it for many who are enrolled in in-person programs. Granted, NTI can be done well, but many students in public schools, especially if they do not have parental support, are not getting an education comparable to what they received in the classroom.

These are just a few of the consequences of restricting the movement, activity, and free will of the entire population. And what’s worse is that the restrictions are somewhat random, with some industries and activities being allowed to continue, while others are not.

Concerns regarding religious liberty may be the most alarming. Church, we are being lulled to sleep, boiled alive, or whatever proverb you want to use. We are operating with our masks not just covering our mouths and noses, but our eyes and ears as well! Some are allowing feelings and experiences to override truth, facts, and even Scripture.

I understand that COVID is real and that people do have devastating health effects, some of which we may not realize for years to come; however, some people act as if this is the only cost, and that we must avoid losing even one life due to this virus. How many of those same people are doing everything they can to avoid cancer, heart disease, and diabetes? How many people who shame others for not wearing a mask would do the same to someone smoking a cigarette or going through the drive-through at a fast-food restaurant? How many of those same people make sure they are doing everything health-wise to avoid the virus? How many text and drive?

It’s time for us to wake up to the possibility that we are being manipulated, and to ask why. This may not be comfortable for some to consider, and I predict that many will be upset by me even suggesting this. Yet, I must. It would be remiss of me to withhold critical thinking in the name of feelings. We must, if we are honest seekers of truth, explore the possibility that we have been conditioned by the media, by our education system, and by the government, to believe things about this virus that are not true. To take it a step further, we may even be responding to this virus in ways that are not correct, and that we may be perpetuating falsehood by going along with the narrative. It’s not wrong to think critically. It’s wrong to allow our feelings to override truth.

If you’ve lost someone due to this virus, I am not downplaying your pain. But I submit to you that I have personally seen things from a different perspective during times of grief, and that perspective has generally been flawed, because grief is all-encompassing. I would also ask you, if your loved one had died of something else, would you be vigilant about the other cause of death? For example, if your loved one died of heart disease, would you be evaluating your health choices in light of your loved one’s death? Would you be changing your eating habits and exercising more? Would you be trying to close down the fast food industry? Would you be shaming people who eat fast food and don’t exercise? These are important questions to ponder, especially given that heart disease is the number one cause of death, and many with COVID had it as a comorbidity. If the answer is “no,” what does that do to your credibility in the way you are handling this virus?

I simply ask that those of you who feel so strongly about these mandates and lockdowns please consider the true statistics and the broader context. I also ask that you try to understand that those of us who feel strongly in the other direction are not malicious, unfeeling, greedy, self-absorbed, indifferent, or stupid. Most of us believe you should be free to make up your own minds about this. Most of us are upset at the powers that have created this pandemic of fear, and we are simply trying to bring truth to light. Most of us would find it easier not to be confrontational, yet we believe in God-given liberty too much to see what is happening and turn a blind eye. We are not your enemy. Please consider our perspective.

So Long, Social Media?

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By Heather Walton

Dear Facebook,

I think it’s time we consider breaking up. I feel like our relationship isn’t healthy. I find myself too dependent on you, checking on you too often, trying to make sure our relationship is still okay. I need to know that people are reading my posts, and I really hope they like them. I know sometimes I write stuff people don’t like, but I really hope they won’t judge me for it, or worse, unfriend me, or even worse, presume my eternal fate. I crave social points. I want to know my worth is secure, and everybody knows that likes, positive emojis, shares, and friend requests offer security. I mean, if everyone on social media thinks I’m alright, well, then I must be. Right … ???

Even then, you know, I’m not sure. You know, there could be people who unfriended me and I didn’t notice. Didn’t I see someone pop up in my friend suggestions yesterday who I thought was already my friend. What was up with that?

And sometimes I post something and somebody doesn’t like it, and they say something really unkind back to me, or they scold me, even calling my character into question. I know you can’t tell tone in a comment, but it sure seems like they’re yelling at me, or shaming me. Maybe I’m not okay after all. Maybe they’re right, and I’m insensitive, or an idiot, or a bad friend. Maybe I really don’t know the right way to think. Maybe I should just stop posting anything that might offend.

But then I try that, and I still end up offending someone over something I didn’t even consider controversial.

Sometimes I wonder which life is reality. Is there a living, breathing representation of me somewhere in cyberspace? Sometimes it sure feels like it!

It used to be that I would fret over the things I actually verbalized to people, and that was enough. Now I also get to overanalyze online dialogue. And I receive feedback from any number of people with whom I never would have shared in person what I posted online because of the sheer volume of people who can be reached in a nanosecond on the Internet. Several post their commentary for my reading “pleasure.” And have you ever noticed how bold people will be online? Most of them would never actually say out loud some of the things their fingers will vomit out onto the screen.

Some people choose to only use social media to showcase themselves. Others to share lighthearted memes and family photos. Nothing wrong with that. But, and I’m sure you’ve noticed, Facebook, I’m kind of intense. I have convictions and I want to share them, not because I want to shove my thoughts down people’s throats, but because I believe in the free exchange of ideas, and because I believe what I have to say is worthy of being heard.

To go even further, I believe God has called me to seek truth and to speak and write about it. If I break things off with you, then I won’t be able to share with them as easily. Do I need you? No. Might God use you to get His message out through me? I hope so. Now that may sound prideful, but for me, writing is a calling. In the parable of the talents, the stewards were expected to use what the Master gave them and to multiply it. My Master has gifted me with the talent of writing, and I dare not bury that talent by keeping it hidden only in my journal. If I did, that would actually be the prideful move.

I really do believe that God has called me to communicate in writing with a fallen, desperate world, to tell them that Jesus is the answer to all that ails them. Sometimes He calls me to write stuff that I really would rather keep to myself. Other times I make mistakes. But my intent is always to glorify God and to serve my fellow man.

So for now, I guess I’ll hang in there. I need to remember that it’s not about me, how I feel, or how comfortable or popular I am. It’s about obedience to share what God has laid on my heart, in hopes that it will encourage and strengthen Christ-followers, and draw unbelievers to Jesus. Sometimes that offends people who disagree, but that doesn’t change God’s call or His truth.

Okay, Facebook, I guess we’ll give it another chance, but I’ve got to remember not to get caught up again in trying too hard and analyzing too much. I have to remember that my real Audience sits on the throne of the universe and not on the other side of a screen.

Sincerely,

Heather Walton

P.S. “For am I now seeking the approval of man, or of God? Or am I trying to please man? If I were still trying to please man, I would not be a servant of Christ.” (Galatians 1:10 ESV).

The Rise of Socialism and the Case for Civil Disobedience

from https://factfile.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/Dietrich-Bonhoeffer-Quotes.jpg

By Heather Walton

I have heard Christians say that we should stay completely out of “politics.” As I’ve prayerfully considered this stance, I’ve found it lacking. Instead, my dual citizenship compels me that, in order to truly be heavenly minded, I must also be of earthly good. Just because Jesus is coming, and hopefully coming soon, that doesn’t mean I shouldn’t be about His business until the very day the trumpet sounds or He takes me home.

My dual citizenship compels me that, in order to truly be heavenly minded, I must also be of earthly good.

Some have said that America is done, past the point of no return, and that we just need to let events play out. While I would agree that it appears that the sun is setting on our beloved republic, and that it is only a matter of time before we willingly submit to socialism, and subsequently join hands with the coming “new world order,” that doesn’t mean it’s time to give up.

Consider the parable of the talents: The master left three servants in charge of various amounts of his wealth. Two servants invested his money wisely and brought a return, and were therefore rewarded. The third, who feared his master, buried the talent apportioned to him, rather than making it work for his master until his return. As a result, he was disinherited and his talent given to another. Only recently did I realize that Jesus shared this parable in the context of end times prophecy. Church, we are not to bury our talents as we await our master’s return! We are to be about our Master’s business until the very last second.

If, instead, we as the church, forfeit the culture war, the war for the very soul of our nation, and the very soul of the church itself, with the excuse that “our citizenship is in heaven,” we should be charged with spiritual treason. He has called us to “rescue those being led to the slaughter,” to hold back evil, to warn the sinner, to admonish the saint, to subdue the earth, to, like our Creator, in whose image we were formed, use our gifts and talents, not to bury them as we await His return. This does not mean our hope is in this world; rather, unless our faith is evidenced by these actions, how are we to draw all men to Him, and ultimately to that eternal reward He desires for them. If the ministers, missionaries, and apostles of old, would have had the attitude that the culture is lost and we simply need to submit to ungodly authority as we await our heavenly Savior’s return, where would the Kingdom of God be today? Would this country even exist?

If, instead, we as the church, forfeit the culture war, the war for the very soul of our nation, and the very soul of the church of itself, with the excuse that “our citizenship is in heaven,” we should be charged with spiritual treason.

Think of men like William Wilberforce, Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Patrick Henry, and George Washington. Think of Daniel, Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego. These men were heroes because they refused to submit to tyranny, and because they instead stood against tyrants on behalf of those who could not stand up or who would not stand up for themselves. They were not necessarily considered heroes by their peers during that time, yet they risked their reputations, their livelihoods, and their very lives for the righteous causes to which they had been called.

“Well, these men were exemplary in their time,” you might say. “They were specially gifted and called by God for those tasks.” Yes and no. We are all plainly called to “love mercy, practice justice, and walk humbly with our God” (Micah 6:8), “to rescue the orphan and widow in their distress and to live lives unstained by the world” (James 1:27), and to “rescue those being led away to the slaughter” (Proverbs 24:11). These admonitions are for all believers, not a select few. We consider these men to be extraordinary, but only because we have settled for mediocrity in the Kingdom of God. We now view ordinary Christianity as extraordinary, or perhaps even as sin.

“Learn to do good; seek justice, correct oppression; bring justice to the fatherless, plead the widow’s cause.”

Isaiah 1:17 ESV

The American church has so watered down the Gospel that countless souls are deluded into the illusion of justification before a holy God; unless we sound the alarm boldly and unwaveringly, their blood will be on our hands.

Perhaps it is because of this watering down that we have bought into such heresies as the social justice gospel, which tells us that man can cure the world’s ills without requiring repentance, easy believism, which gives us Jesus as Savior while neglecting His Lordship, and “open and affirming” faith communities, which deny essential scriptural truths.

We now view ordinary Christianity as extraordinary, or perhaps even as sin.

Perhaps it is because of this watering down that we have believed the lie that we need to keep our faith private and not speak into the culture. That there are two realms — the sacred and the secular. Not at all! Either Jesus is our life and governs every aspect, or we are not alive in Christ at all!

If the Gospel hasn’t changed our lives, we haven’t accepted it, and are not beneficiaries of His grace. This is sobering, as it should be. We are called to examine ourselves in light of the Gospel, and judge ourselves, not by our peers’ actions and reactions, but by the Word of God. If we are not in line with it, if we are offended by it, if we are unwilling to live by it, we would be presumptuous to trust our eternal security.

Do we live our lives worthy of this very Gospel? Does our faith cost us anything? Should it perhaps cost us everything? In attempting to keep our lives, we lose them, but in losing our lives for Jesus’ sake and for His Gospel, we gain an eternal glory to which nothing in this world compares.

We have allowed a stunning degree of apostasy into the church. We have played the harlot with the gods of this world. We have trampled the grace of God with the foulest of sins, and we have failed to reprove — and worse, even given hearty approval to — those who prostitute themselves to an Americanized “grace.” In doing so, we have baptized converts into the very gates of hell. For this, we must give an account. From this, we must repent.

Christians, our country is falling fast into an evil that steals, kills, and destroys. That evil is socialism, an ideology devoid of God, an ideology that dictators have used to rise to power at the expense of the vulnerable. Do the names Lenin, Stalin, and Hitler bring up any hint of virtue? No, these men are considered an anathema in the rolls of history. These men were all socialists, communists, Marxists.

Socialism, a pretty name for Marxism, is purely evil. Today it may look like the government is doing some good things that fall in the realm of socialism, but don’t be deceived. Consider public education: isn’t it a good thing? How would our children learn to read and write and do math otherwise? How would they become responsible citizens otherwise? What about the poor who can’t afford private schools?

Don’t fall for it!

Give me four years to teach the children and the seed I have sown will never be uprooted.

Vladmir Lenin

“He alone, who owns the youth, gains the future.”

Adolf Hitler

John Dewey, father of modern public schools, believed that the best way to change the society for the better was through education. As a religious humanist, Dewey believed it was the duty of the schools and other social institutions to transform society, from what he saw as the antiquated traditional model embraced by theists, to a modern secular society ruled by pragmatism and a devotion to community ideals.

Public schools are a socialist construct. Before the state ran public schools, the church offered free education to those who were able to partake. Others were home educated in academics, practical skills, vocations, or a combination. The humanistic, socialistic takeover of schools was by design, and as a result, we have ridden the slippery slope into a pit of immorality and decadence, and our children can not understand the Bible or the Constitution, and they scoff at both. Government has no place in educating our children; it is our responsibility as the church and as the family.

The result of the slide into socialism is that we now are canceled as old-fashioned, homophobes, closed-minded, delusional bigots who are out of touch with reality. In many cases, our neighbors, family members, friends, and even our own children have developed animosity and bitterness toward us, but more importantly toward the God that created them. Yet, some still spout scripture to justify their attitudes and action, and they even use it against us.

For example, in my home state, our governor regularly cites his faith as reason to implement tyrannical measures to “fight the coronavirus,” yet this same man defies the God he cites allegiance to by celebrating homosexuality and abortion. This man who alleges to personally feel the pain of every loss to this virus has no problem severing the livelihoods of healthy people and shaming those who don’t agree. He tramples liberty and belittles those who disagree.

Submitting to unjust laws is not Biblical. Should the German Christians have submitted to Hitler? Of course not! But it was a gradual descent, one that they probably didn’t see because it started out subtle and continued subtly until they got to a point of no return. It likely would have been hard to recognize as it was happening, unless they were really paying attention. In saying that, I’m not likening any of our government officials to Hitler, but I’m simply saying that, if the German Christians would have seen the whole picture from the beginning, perhaps they would not have submitted to the gradual steps that got them to the horrific place they ended up.

I don’t believe this nation has much longer. However, that doesn’t mean we shouldn’t try to hold back the darkness as long as we can. I don’t necessarily mean to take up arms. But I do mean that I will not submit to unjust mandates if it is in my power to resist, and I’m not doing it to “demand my rights,” but instead to demand your God-given, Constitutionally-affirmed, rights as His image-bearers. If that makes me unpopular, or if it brings me difficult consequences, so be it. Regardless of how one feels about liberty, it is an absolute, and I won’t give up our collective liberties without resistance.

Perspectives on the current crisis and coming cure

By Heather Walton

“I can’t believe this is America!” I’m not sure how many times I’ve said that in the past few weeks. This country is becoming decreasingly recognizable as the America I grew up in, as the America I committed to defend, as the America I once took great pride in.

Lockdowns, mandates, rioting, talk of a coming mandatory vaccine. Chaos around every corner.

Nothing is more shocking than the covert rise of socialism that has suddenly emerged into plain sight and that looms close on the horizon. How did this happen? Why do young people (and old) think this is okay?

We could analyze this from a historical perspective and trace the roots back to Darwin, Nietzsche, Marx, Dewey, and countless American Socialists/Humanists throughout the generations. The tentacles of this beast are pervasive and destructive.

We could analyze this from a political perspective and defend the free market economy from philosophical, economic, and biblical viewpoints, and we would see that socialism doesn’t work.

Instead, I would like to analyze this from a worldview perspective. How is it that our society has bought into the lie that we can create a Utopia where there is no poverty, no inequality, no difficulty? Where the government owes us peace, prosperity, and health? Where we allow a few to dictate to the majority of us that we are politically incorrect, homophobic, bigoted, privileged, and flat-out wrong if we have biblical values? Where trees and insects are more valuable than people? Where feelings dictate our perceived reality, and facts no longer matter? Where we fear the whims of children and ignore the wisdom of the elderly?

This is by design. The enemy masquerades as an angel of light and has deceived the whole world into thinking that humans can solve their own problems, that God is dead, that we evolved from primordial goo, that this life is all there is, and that we must therefore do everything we can to make it everything we can while we’re here. “You only live once! Follow your heart! Live your dreams! Live and let live! Love who you want!”

This year has been shocking to many, but it didn’t come out of nowhere. The world has been working toward this chaos for many years, and this chaos is part of the process of our evolution toward the grand finale, in which a cosmic battle will conclude.

There is a Satanic plot to steal, kill, and destroy, and that plot has been unfolding since the Garden of Eden. Today we see it manifested in so many ways, including blatant deception through the media and education, election fraud, division on every imaginable and created issue, and worldwide civil unrest. The devil and those he has deceived into working for his agenda are creating mass chaos so that they can be false saviors who bring order from chaos.

The Bible tells us that one day Jesus will return for his bride, the church. When He returns, we need to be ready. Church, be ready! He is coming soon. How soon? That’s a mystery. The Bible tells us we won’t know the day or the hour, that He will come like a thief in the night, that it will be sudden. However, we should recognize the season, but we have to be paying attention, and we have to guard our relationship with God as the day grows closer.

We are told to endure to the end, and we are warned a great falling away of believers in the last days. No matter what lies ahead — persecution, tribulation, martyrdom — we must be steadfast. There is nothing more precious or prized than our eternity, and nothing is worth missing the riches of an eternal home with our Savior.

There is one cure for what ails our nation — Jesus. That is all. Sound simplistic? Perhaps. It is a simple answer, yet not an easy one.

Many people believe that turning to Jesus is as simple as inviting Him into your life as your Savior. While this is part of it, this would be what Dietrich Bonhoeffer referred to as “cheap grace.”

According to Bonhoeffer, who was martyred for his stand against Hitler, grace is costly. It was costly to Christ, of course, but it also is costly to those of us who partake.

“The grace he (Martin Luther) had received was a costly grace. It was grace, for it was like water on parched ground, comfort in tribulation, freedom from bondage of a self-chosen way, and forgiveness of all his sins. And it was costly, for, so far from dispensing him from good works, it meant that he must take the call to discipleship more seriously than ever before. It was grace because it cost so much, and it cost so much because it was grace.”

Dietrich Bonhoeffer, The Cost of Discipleship (italics mine)

The American church has cheapened the concept of grace by, whether purposefully or inadvertently, deluding people into believing that they can simply say a quick prayer, asking Jesus to be their Savior, and then continue business as usual. Brothers and sisters, may we never be guilty of this heresy!

We are told in Romans 10:9-10 (ESV), “if you confess with your mouth that Jesus is Lord and believe in your heart that God raised him from the dead, you will be saved. For with the heart one believes and is justified, and with the mouth one confesses and is saved” (emphasis mine). Lord means master, one who is in charge. Servants submit to their lord’s will and order their lives according to his wishes; they do not tell him what they will do or not do; they do not tell him what his orders mean or what he demands; they do not shape him according to their image and likeness. Their works don’t make them his servants; on the contrary, they do his work because he is their lord.

We are called to be disciples, which means students. We are to study our master and to emulate Him, and we are to teach the next generation to do the same. The Bible is clear about many matters of morality. If we choose to dismiss this divine instruction, we should not delude ourselves into thinking that Jesus is our Lord. And if He is not our Lord, then we serve the god of this age, the devil.

Make no mistake: Things in this world will get worse, and it will be increasingly difficult to live out the Christian life. The church must be steadfast. It may require everything we have, including our lives. Whether or not we are martyred in Christ’s name, we are to willingly die to ourselves daily, every day we have breath in our lungs.

The future of this nation and this world are bleak, yet we await a kingdom not of this world. In the meantime, we are called to shine forth as gold, to share the true Gospel, and to serve our fellow man. We are to worship the Lord in Spirit and in truth. And we are to “love mercy, practice justice, and walk humbly with our God” (Micah 6:8).

The current and coming crisis are the result of man’s sinfulness, for which there is one and only cure: the costly grace of the risen Christ! If you don’t know Him, I urge you to repent and surrender to Him today. If you do know Him, yet aren’t following Him as fully as you ought, I urge you to repent and surrender to Him today. This is the cure to all crises, both temporal and eternal.

Cure for The Fear Pandemic

By Heather Walton

About 20 years ago, shortly after I became a Christian, I was participating in some job training. One day we took a lunch break at a local outdoor food court. As we ate, a bee took an interest in my food and wouldn’t leave me alone. I was terrified of insects, especially the stinging type, so I began panicking like a 3-year-old. One of my fellow trainees, a middle-aged Jewish woman, looked at me pointedly and said, “You know, I’m really surprised that someone with your great faith would be so scared of a little bee.”

At that moment, I was stung with such conviction that I determined that I would no longer fear insects, and to this day, I have succeeded. My fear had ruined my ability to enjoy lunch, but more than that, it had marred my testimony to an unbelieving friend.

A pastor told a story of a family taking a car trip in which a bee decided to ride along. One of the children was shrieking in terror, when his father decided to intervene. The father caught the bee in his hand, took the sting, and then let the bee continue to fly around the car. He assured his child that there was nothing more to fear, since he had already taken the stinger. The pastor likened this father to our Lord, who took the sting of death for those who trust in Him, that we might not fear the sting of death.

How many of us are doing just that, though? We are living in fear of so many things today:

  • a microscopic virus that could make us sick and has less than 1% chance of killing us
  • violent crime
  • losing our livelihood
  • losing our savings
  • being shamed for wearing/not wearing a mask
  • losing our civil liberties
  • who will win the election
  • being forced to take a vaccine
  • what the next big development of 2020 will be

Add to the list any personal fears we each carry, and it can be really overwhelming.

I’ve been considering a few questions lately:

What’s more important — surviving or living?

First, what’s more important — surviving or living? If I have to live in a bubble in order to stay alive, is that really living? If I have to fear every little thing when I walk out of my house and every little thing that comes into my house, is that really living? If I am missing out on relationships, is that really living? Would I rather live long or would I rather live well?

I’ve also pondered why this particular illness is the ONE that has us all paralyzed and isolated. We’ve never done anything like this before, as far as shutting down so systematically and for so long. Other illnesses and activities have killed far more people, but went virtually unnoticed. What’s the difference?

Part of the problem today, I think, is that we are so entitled as Americans. We believe that we simply should live to be very old and that we should have our needs provided for us. We expect life to be safe and sterile, and current events don’t fit our expectations.

I look at America today and, technological advances aside, I doubt our ancestors would recognize us. Think about it: People boarded ships, risking illness, starvation, and death, to come to America. Pioneers trekked across the country on foot and in wagons, risking life and limb, to make a better life for themselves and their posterity. America has been known for its independent spirit. Americans have historically been leaders who took risks to advance and rise above circumstances. Yet, here we are, allowing our country to be brought to a screeching halt by a microscopic organism that is not nearly as likely to affect us as the dangers our patriot predecessors faced.

At the turn of the 20th century, the average life expectancy was mid-forties, meaning I personally probably would have gone onto glory by my age if I had lived during that time. Today, we expect — even demand — to live twice that long. The average coronavirus death happens to those over the average life expectancy, and though every death is sad, it seems presumptuous for us to expect to cheat death. With the exception of two people in history (Enoch and Elijah), every single person has died or will die, barring the rapture. God has determined every one of our days before even one of them came to be, so for us to think we can come up with a humanistic solution to the problem of death is utterly prideful and foolish.

We are creating a generation of germaphobes and hypochondriacs. We need to remember that we shouldn’t fear death so much as we should fear and revere the One who determines how we spend eternity.

Another area of fear relates to our liberty. There are people threatening America’s freedoms, people who violate the Constitution in the name of peace and safety and people who push a Marxist agenda. Many of us know we need to stand against this, yet we are afraid to do so. We fear legal penalties, social stigma, family safety, and more. We would do well to look at the example of our nation’s founders. They put it all on the line for their families and their descendants. They risked all of this for us, people who were not yet born, but would benefit from their willingness to sacrifice. How would they feel, knowing we have taken this freedom so for granted that we don’t mind giving it up?

Let’s take it a step further: How must God feel toward us, knowing that He created our bodies to be resilient and our brains to be wise, yet we are so fearful? How must He feel, knowing that He sent His precious Son to die for us, that we may have the abundant, eternal life, yet we are so caught up in the physical existence? How must he feel, knowing that He died to set us free, never again to be enslaved, yet we willingly submit ourselves to multiple yokes of slavery? How must He feel, seeing us shaking our fists, kicking our legs, writhing in anger and fear, and demanding long life, prosperity, and security, when He has all of those things laid up for us, just not in the form we demand?

There are at least 100 verses that tell us not to fear. Why?

  1. God is on His throne.
  2. He is never taken by surprise.
  3. He has promised never to leave or forsake us.
  4. He has our best interest in mind.
  5. He takes care of the lilies and the birds, and will certainly take care of us.
  6. He loves us.
  7. He is our father and we are His children.
  8. He determined our times and places, and knew all of our days before even one came to be.
  9. He gave us a spirit of power and a sound mind.
  10. He has promised us the abundant life.
  11. Our eternal life is secure if we trust in Him.
  12. He delights to take care of us.
  13. He will provide for us in the midst of our enemies.
  14. He will not allow evil to triumph.
  15. Nothing can separate us from His love.
  16. He is the One with the power over life and death.
  17. Greater is He that is in us than He that is in the world.
  18. He will uphold us with His righteous right hand.
  19. He has already told us how it ends. Spoiler: He wins and we get the spoils.
  20. He has prepared a place for us.
  21. We are already seated with Him in heaven.
  22. He has freed us from slavery.
  23. He has taken away the sting of death.
  24. He will not allow us to be tempted beyond what we can bear.
  25. He is in control!

I could go on forever …

If you’re a Christ follower and you’re fearful or anxious, this is understandable, especially given the uncertainty we currently face, yet the Lord has given us the remedy:

… do not be anxious about anything, but in everything by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known to God. And the peace of God, which surpasses all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.

Philippians 4:6-7 ESV

This is the believer’s prescription for peace. It’s not necessarily easy, but it is attainable.

If you don’t yet know the Lord, then no wonder you are anxious or concerned; not only is this life precarious, but your eternity is unsettled. I have good news: That can change today!

Simply acknowledge that you are a sinner, meaning you agree with God that you’ve done bad things, and that you have offended Him with those actions. Because of this, you don’t deserve to spend eternity in His presence. However, God sent His Son, Jesus, to live as a man, to identify with our weaknesses, to live a perfect life, and to die an atoning death, not for His own sins, because He was sinless, but for our sins. Accept that payment for your sins and transfer your allegiance from this world and your flesh to Him. Commit to allowing Him to be in charge of your life from here on out. Confess Him as your Lord, knowing that He died for your sins and rose from the dead, confirming that He is God and that He has authority to forgive sins and power to give you eternal life. When you do, He will save you and begin the process of sanctifying you, which means making you a more Christlike person. Your eternity will be secure, and you will be reconciled to Him. This will give you peace, joy, and comfort, no matter what circumstances come your way. Out of response for what He has done, get plugged into a local congregation, get baptized, read the Bible, pray, and serve others, all in order to know Him better and to glorify God to others, all because you’re grateful for His free gift. We can’t earn any of this; we simply accept it and it’s ours.

A right relationship with God, one in which we believe His promises are true and that He has our best interest in mind, is the cure for the fear pandemic.

It’s all about control

By Heather Walton

We need to protect the most vulnerable.

We must protect our Constitutional rights.

Where is my unemployment?

I will not wear a mask!

It’s my body, and my choice.

Everyone needs to take the vaccine before we can get back to normal.

I will not take a vaccine.

Answer the phone when the health department calls, and cooperate with the contact tracers.

I will not answer the phone. In fact, I’m not doing any updates on my phone and I’ll leave it at home when I go out. 

You don’t value my life!

You don’t value my livelihood!

Since the beginning of the human race, it’s been about control. Did God really say you should not eat of any tree in the garden? … He knows that when you eat of it, you’ll be like God, knowing good and evil (Genesis 3). In other words, He is in control, but if you eat this fruit, you can be in control.

Our struggle is not against flesh and blood, but the enemy of old, Satan, sure wants us to think it is (Ephesians 6:12). We get angry because we want to be in control. We fear because we want to be in control.

Guess what: we are NOT in control! We never have been. It’s an illusion. God is in control, but He has temporarily allowed Satan to be in control of certain aspects of the world (Matthew 4:8-9; Luke 4:5-6; John 14:30; John 12:31-33; Ephesians 2:1-3). I believe that the “spirit of the antichrist” which has been in the world since the beginning, is largely a spirit of control (1 John 2:18; 1 John 4:3). Satan himself, as Lucifer, fell from heaven because he wanted to be in control, rather than trusting God to be in control (Isaiah 14:12-15; Luke 10:18).

When we allow God to be in control of our lives (Romans 10:9-11) by accepting Jesus as Lord (master, one in charge), we gain a peace that passes all understanding (Philippians 4:7). The very things we desire to have control for — peace, provision, victory over death — we gain by giving up control. It seems like a paradox, doesn’t it? However, it is true.

The spirit of the antichrist may soon be revealed as world leaders navigate this global crisis (2 Thessalonians 2:1-12; 1 John 2:18). They have a global answer: They believe we need to seek world peace through a concept called globalism. They believe all people need to unite to end world hunger, poverty, inequality, illiteracy, “overpopulation,” and so on; however, God called us to scatter, to fill the earth and subdue it. Granted, our greed has tempted us to become bad stewards of the earth and to oppress people. That doesn’t change the fact that God wills us to populate, to work, and to be diverse. At the tower of Babel, the people wanted to stick together. They defied God by building a tower, not so they could reach heaven, but so they could keep from wandering too far. God had told them to scatter, but they reasoned that if they could build a tall enough tower, they could make sure that they could all see it, and that way they wouldn’t go too far. They would stay one global community, in defiance of God’s clear command to spread out. He confounded their language so that they would not remain together (Genesis 11).

Today, some of the world’s most powerful people want to control the world once again by uniting us all in a global community. This global crisis calls for a global solution, they say. They want control, pure and simple. Their motives may look noble and pure, but in reality, they don’t trust God. Did God really say? Is there really even a God? Don’t you know that we can do anything we set our minds to? 

Many people believe would agree with Bill Gates:

“I’ve been very lucky, and therefore I owe it to try and reduce the inequity in the world. And that’s kind of a religious belief. I mean, it’s at least a moral belief,” said Gates. “I agree with people like Richard Dawkins that mankind felt the need for creation myths. Before we really began to understand disease and the weather and things like that, we sought false explanations for them. Now science has filled in some of the realm – not all – that religion used to fill.” (Rolling Stone, March 13, 2014)

You see, if science is the answer, we can control that. We can’t control God, but we can, at least in some ways, control science. We can control what we understand, but we cannot understand God because His ways are so far above our ways that they are beyond comprehension (Isaiah 55:8-9). We don’t like that. We want to understand. We want to know. We want to control.

We cannot control, but we can put our lives in the hands of the One who is in control, the One who can give us the abundant life now and eternal life when we die (Deuteronomy 30:19; Joshua 24:15; John 3:16-17; John 10:9-10).

It seems to me that so many of us are addressing the things we can’t control and are angry at those who seem to hinder our control. In the end, though, we are all going to die and our fortunes will be given to another (Psalm 39:6; Psalm 49:10; Proverbs 27:1; Luke 12). We aren’t guaranteed our next breath or our next paycheck, no matter how hard we try. We should take good care of our bodies, we should work hard to earn a living, and we should try to keep our country free from tyranny. However, we also must recognize that our days are numbered and the world can change in a moment’s notice. We could literally be ushered into the presence of our Creator at any moment. We need to be ready.

The one thing we can do to control our future is to put our lives and our eternity into the hands of the One who possesses ultimate control.

If you have never accepted Jesus as Lord, you can do that right now. This takes an honest and genuine acknowledgement that you are a sinner, that you can’t do enough good deeds to be right with God because He is holy and we are unholy, that you need Him to save you, and that you are willing to follow Him and allow Him to govern your life. Baptism is the outward expression of this inward decision and should be done publicly and by immersion, in an act of obedience, submission, and testimonial to others. You also should read the Bible, pray, gather with other believers, and obey God’s commands, not to be saved, but out of gratitude for salvation, a desire to grow in your relationship with God, and in hopes of winning others to the Lord. If you have any questions about that, reach out to a believer you know, begin fellowship with a local church, and/or reach out by filling out the contact form below.