Tag Archives: liberty

What is the true cost of liberty?

From thenation.com

By Heather Walton

What does liberty cost? And if you knew how to get it, what would you be willing to give for it?

Many today mistakenly put their trust in countries, governments, leaders, organizations, or other human entities. People all over the world have joined the ranks of Q-anon and other groups that believe President Trump has the solutions for the world’s problems. Many worry that if he is not in power, the whole world will cave in to the New World Order, democracy will be lost, that socialism will overtake us, and that all will be lost. I do believe we are headed for socialism, as well as the end times. I do believe that we are moving toward one world government and the rise of the antichrist and the beast system. While we are likely going to lose many freedoms, our republic, and perhaps even our lives, that doesn’t mean we will lose our liberty.

Does that sound ludicrous?

Look at it this way:

No matter who is in the White House, God is on His throne. No matter what goes on in Washington, heaven’s purposes will be fulfilled. Sometimes things seem really bad, and sometimes they truly are, but keep in mind that, for the Christ-follower, our heavenly citizenship overrides our national citizenship. Jesus is preparing a place for us that is so much better than anything here on earth. Our Savior has already come and will return one day. No mere man can save us. No mere man can save America or the world. No kingdom can rise or fall without God’s permission. If America falls, and I believe it will, it will be because God has allowed it, and perhaps even purposed it. Things are not always as they appear. If your hope has been in any man but Christ, perhaps today is the day for that to change. If you do not yet know Jesus as Lord, today could be the best day to become part of His family.


One thing 2020 did for me was to loosen my grip on this world and its grip on me. I am a patriot, but I have become deeply aware that my true citizenship is in heaven, and I have come to long for the day I arrive there.


There is much in this world to grieve us, but it’s time to let go, to go through the grief process, and to accept that no man can be our savior and that no country is invincible.


Without a personal relationship with Jesus, we have no hope. This life is but a blink of an eye compared to eternity, so we need to be sure our eternity is secure. Nothing matters otherwise.


For what will it profit a man if he gains the whole world, yet loses his soul? Nothing — nothing is worth spending an eternity of regret.


None of us know what the future will hold or how much time we have on this earth. If you don’t know the Lord, please put your trust in Him today. If you do know Him, please spend every last breath and ounce of energy urging others to repent and put their trust in Christ. There is nothing more vital.


Persecution is coming to the church. Whether we have a week or ten years to openly worship and to share the Gospel, we need to use that time to the fullest.


And if you’re putting off a decision for Christ, you may find yourself suddenly standing before God and realizing that it’s too late. We all are sinners. Hell is real. Heaven is too. Jesus wants to forgive your sins and be in charge of your life, but you need to acknowledge your sinfulness, accept him as Lord (Master), agree that you want to change, and put all your trust in Him. Otherwise, you remain lost in your sins and on the road to hell.

True liberty comes from finding freedom in Christ. When your sins are forgiven, and you have a relationship with the living God, no matter what griefs come in this lifetime, the assurance of eternity with God in heaven is enough.

Perhaps America must fall in order for Christ to be lifted up in the world, or even in our lives. Perhaps men need to be brought down off their pedestals, that those who have put their hope in them may give up their idolatry and turn their eyes on Jesus, the author of liberty and our only true hope. If the “Land of the Free” must fall in order for us to understand true liberty, so be it.

Patrick Henry said, “Give me liberty or give me death.”

Today perhaps we should say, “Give me death (to my hopes and desires), that I may understand and enjoy true liberty.”

Why I Stand and Where I’ll Fall

Photo by Wendy van Zyl on Pexels.com

By Heather Walton

The apostle Paul was a Christ follower, as were Barnabas and Mark. Yet they had a sharp disagreement that unfortunately kept them apart for many years. Really it seems like it was over something that really shouldn’t have been a long term issue, yet it was. Before that they had been very close and a great team. The enemy seeks to divide but God’s purposes stand.

As I’m seeking the Lord and zealous to do His will, it is not a secret that some folks, some godly folks, some folks I greatly respect, some folks I love, believe I am misguided. I don’t believe I am, but I respect anyone’s right to disagree. In fact, I want to protect that very right to believe differently and to speak up about differing beliefs, and that’s why I’ve taken the stands I have.

Our founding fathers were godly, albeit imperfect, men who sought the Lord and framed the Constitution from a Biblical worldview. Those who wrote the Declaration of Independence and those who supported the War for Independence risked everything, including their livelihoods, their safety, their families’ safety, their reputations, and their friendships, because they felt called by God that men should have freedom, not a selfish freedom, because they knew they may not even live to see that freedom. Like those in the Hebrews Hall of Faith, they did this for a higher purpose than themselves. These people were law breakers when it came to King George’s tyrannical laws, and many faulted them for it. But they appealed to a higher Law. God made us in His image. As His image bearers, we have laws that transcend the Constitution, but because the Constitution is based on God’s Law, and it is the highest law of our country and our Commonwealth, I will protect it however I can. In fact, in 1989, I took an oath to do so, and that oath had no expiration date.

My friend from Uganda sent me very graphic pictures of people dead and dying in the streets bc of lockdowns that cause people to starve. If liberty fails here, the world is impacted. I firmly believe we have a responsibility to steward what He has entrusted.I look at people like William Wilberforce and Dietrich Bonheffer, and I’m inspired. These men were not daunted by the fact that few stood with them and that many were opposed. They were sure of their calling and accountable to God above all.

I don’t pretend to be worthy of the company of such men, but I am inspired by their bravery and commitment. I have had few trials in comparison, but I am willing to pay the price because I’m assured of God’s calling and because liberty — true liberty — is worth it.

My greatest allegiance is to the Lord Jesus Christ. I don’t take that lightly. I stand on liberty because He bought it for us. That transcends political borders and parties and has eternal consequences. The things we are seeing run far deeper than masks, vaccines, and lockdowns. There is no political party with the answer. I do not take a political stand. I stand for truth. I stand for Christ, and if I fall, I fall into His arms.

COVID in KY: What do these numbers mean?

By Heather Walton

I examined the statistics for Kentucky on the CDC’s death statistics and made some observations from the following data:

This chart is part of the data found at https://data.cdc.gov/NCHS/Weekly-Counts-of-Deaths-by-State-and-Select-Causes/muzy-jte6/data

1. I calculated the actual Kentucky deaths from week 15 to week 42 of 2019 and 2020, because that period reflects the beginning of the COVID deaths and allows for enough time to have passed that the data for 2020 should be complete. In doing so, I got these numbers for Kentucky: 2019: 25,209 total deaths; 2020: 27,744 total deaths. That means 2,535 more deaths for Kentucky during that period, accounting for about 93 deaths per week. That could be statistically significant, but we do need to control for other factors.

2. I calculated the deaths by natural causes from the same periods and for 2019, there were 22,933, and for 2020, there were 24,919. This means there were 1,926 more deaths by natural causes, which brings the above number to 71 deaths per week, 22 less weekly than the total. This means there were 2,276 unnatural deaths for that period in 2019, and 2,825 unnatural deaths in 2020.

It is important to investigate the effects of the pandemic and its mitigation measures on unnatural deaths, because causation and/or correlation there could be evidence that lockdowns are at least partially counterproductive. Also, if you make the case that civil unrest is unrelated to the lockdowns, then those figures should be considered independently. And if you make the case that lockdowns are causal, at least partially, to civil unrest, then the cure could be partially responsible for continuing cases and deaths due to the virus.

3. According to data from the U.S. Census Bureau and World Population Review, the population of KY increased by 32,017 between July 2019 and the present, which is a .35% increase. We should expect rising death rates with rising population, and we should expect the death rates to outnumber the population growth because of the aging population.

4. According to scholarly research, mortality has been disproportionate in skilled nursing facilities, with around 34% of the deaths occurring in nursing homes. In fact, Dr. Steven Stack said during the November 30 Governor’s briefing that two thirds of Kentucky COVID deaths have been in nursing homes. This, of course, is tragic, but does not support lockdowns; it may actually build a case against them.

I believe it is important to think critically and have productive dialogue regarding the issues of our day. We must not rely on others’ opinions, but should do our own research and ask thoughtful questions before coming to conclusions.

In doing so, I’m not trying to downplay anyone’s pain or personal experience with the virus; on the contrary, it is crucial to examine the impact of COVID-19 from multiple perspectives. I have repeatedly been told that, if I had experienced the devastation of this virus, I would think and behave differently. To that I say, is there anyone who hasn’t experienced the devastation of this virus? And why do some people limit the negative impact to catching the virus or deaths attributed to the virus? It goes so much deeper than that:

Consider the impact on people’s livelihoods: In Louisville alone, hundreds of businesses have closed this year. Many workers have been laid off. Our state economy has been devastated. You might say that this isn’t as important as the loss of human life. In fact, it does sound like a reasonable concession to make for the sake of so many potential lives lost. However, when we consider that perhaps the numbers are being over-dramatized, it should make us pause. Even if they weren’t, we need to look at the short and long-term consequences of this huge economic loss. Indeed, it could result in loss of life, and definitely results in loss of quality of life.

Depression and anxiety are on the rise. This is a major consequence of the lockdowns. Many children and adolescents are suffering from the lack of true social interaction and the uncertainty perpetuated by these mitigation measures and the media attention given to the pandemic. Unemployment also contributes to mental health, as does isolation. And what about the elderly who are not allowed visitors, even in the final moments of their lives? It seems downright unreasonable that the government has even mandated that people die alone.

Students are receiving less-than-ideal education, because non-traditional instruction (NTI) is not cutting it for many who are enrolled in in-person programs. Granted, NTI can be done well, but many students in public schools, especially if they do not have parental support, are not getting an education comparable to what they received in the classroom.

These are just a few of the consequences of restricting the movement, activity, and free will of the entire population. And what’s worse is that the restrictions are somewhat random, with some industries and activities being allowed to continue, while others are not.

Concerns regarding religious liberty may be the most alarming. Church, we are being lulled to sleep, boiled alive, or whatever proverb you want to use. We are operating with our masks not just covering our mouths and noses, but our eyes and ears as well! Some are allowing feelings and experiences to override truth, facts, and even Scripture.

I understand that COVID is real and that people do have devastating health effects, some of which we may not realize for years to come; however, some people act as if this is the only cost, and that we must avoid losing even one life due to this virus. How many of those same people are doing everything they can to avoid cancer, heart disease, and diabetes? How many people who shame others for not wearing a mask would do the same to someone smoking a cigarette or going through the drive-through at a fast-food restaurant? How many of those same people make sure they are doing everything health-wise to avoid the virus? How many text and drive?

It’s time for us to wake up to the possibility that we are being manipulated, and to ask why. This may not be comfortable for some to consider, and I predict that many will be upset by me even suggesting this. Yet, I must. It would be remiss of me to withhold critical thinking in the name of feelings. We must, if we are honest seekers of truth, explore the possibility that we have been conditioned by the media, by our education system, and by the government, to believe things about this virus that are not true. To take it a step further, we may even be responding to this virus in ways that are not correct, and that we may be perpetuating falsehood by going along with the narrative. It’s not wrong to think critically. It’s wrong to allow our feelings to override truth.

If you’ve lost someone due to this virus, I am not downplaying your pain. But I submit to you that I have personally seen things from a different perspective during times of grief, and that perspective has generally been flawed, because grief is all-encompassing. I would also ask you, if your loved one had died of something else, would you be vigilant about the other cause of death? For example, if your loved one died of heart disease, would you be evaluating your health choices in light of your loved one’s death? Would you be changing your eating habits and exercising more? Would you be trying to close down the fast food industry? Would you be shaming people who eat fast food and don’t exercise? These are important questions to ponder, especially given that heart disease is the number one cause of death, and many with COVID had it as a comorbidity. If the answer is “no,” what does that do to your credibility in the way you are handling this virus?

I simply ask that those of you who feel so strongly about these mandates and lockdowns please consider the true statistics and the broader context. I also ask that you try to understand that those of us who feel strongly in the other direction are not malicious, unfeeling, greedy, self-absorbed, indifferent, or stupid. Most of us believe you should be free to make up your own minds about this. Most of us are upset at the powers that have created this pandemic of fear, and we are simply trying to bring truth to light. Most of us would find it easier not to be confrontational, yet we believe in God-given liberty too much to see what is happening and turn a blind eye. We are not your enemy. Please consider our perspective.

Masquerade: Facing Constitutional Facts

By Heather Walton

I recently had the opportunity to testify during a public hearing regarding Kentucky’s mask mandate (902 KAR 2:210E). There were many amazing people on the zoom call, testifying about various reasons the mask mandate is unconstitutional and sharing compelling personal stories and scholarly research to support their positions. (This is not a statement that people shouldn’t wear masks, as that should be an individual choice, but rather that the government should not regulate this decision.) This is the first time I’ve attended such a hearing, and I found it to be a worthwhile way to participate in our democratic process. Here are my comments, taken from the transcript:

“Thank you so much for this opportunity to speak, and I just want to say I appreciate everyone’s comments. I’ve been very impressed with the depth of research and experiences that you all are willing to share.

So, I’m going to start off by saying when I was seventeen years old, I took an oath to uphold the Constitution against enemies foreign and domestic. I don’t feel released from that oath, and I think that our Constitution is being trampled in all sorts of ways today. While my allegiance was specific to the U.S. Constitution and I do believe that Constitution is being trampled, I am going to argue from the Kentucky Constitution, the Constitution of the Commonwealth of Kentucky, which is subordinate to our national Constitution. So, to clarify, the Constitution is the highest law of our Commonwealth and it gives all the branches of government, including the Executive Branch, its power.

And the Preamble of that Constitution says:

“We, the people of the Commonwealth of Kentucky, grateful to Almighty God for the civil, political and religious liberties we enjoy, and invoking the continuance of these blessings, do ordain and establish this Constitution.”

Preamble to the constitution of the commonwealth of Kentucky

So, first, we are entitled to both political and religious liberty and our Constitution was founded on these liberties. The mask issue is highly political, and, for some, it may violate their religious liberty. When we’re looking at a document, an original source, we should define it in terms of the way that it would have been defined at that time. And, so, I want to go to a couple of Websters 1828 Dictionary definitions, the first one being the word political, and political means,

“pertaining to a nation or state, or to nations or states, as distinguished from civil or municipal; as in the phrase, political and civil rights, the former comprehending rights that belong to a nation, or perhaps to a citizen as an individual of a nation; and the latter comprehending the local rights of a corporation or any member of it.

Webster’s 1828 Dictionary

And the definition of liberty civil liberty is,

“the liberty of men in a state of society, or natural liberty so far only abridged and restrained, as is necessary and expedient for the safety and interest of the society, state or nation. A restraint of natural liberty not necessary or expedient for the public is tyranny or oppression. Civil liberty is an exemption from the arbitrary will of others, which exemption is secured by established laws, which restrain every man from injuring or controlling another.” Hence the restraints of law are essential to civil liberty.”

Webster’s 1828 Dictionary

So, moving on to Section 1 of the Bill of Rights of the Kentucky Constitution which addresses the “rights of life, liberty, worship, pursuit of safety and happiness, free speech and acquiring and protecting property, peaceful assembly, redress of grievances and bearing arms, all men are by nature free and equal and have certain inherent and inalienable rights, among which may be reckoned.

First: The right of enjoying and defending their lives and liberties. Second: The right of worshiping Almighty God according to the dictates of their consciences. Third: The right of seeking and pursuing their safety and happiness. And fourth: The right of freely communicating their thoughts and opinions.”

Constitution of the Commonwealth of Kentucky, Bill of Rights, Section 1

So, we should have the freedom to choose, and with no other infectious disease have we gone to these measures. Will we from this time forward have to mask? According to the World Economic Forum, we probably will. Infectious diseases are a part of life and people will die from them at times. The majority of those who have died, though, from Coronavirus-19 have outlived the average life expectancy and, thus, likely may have died of something else within a relatively close time line or effectively could have died of something else with COVID listed as the reason of death but it was merely a complication of the original illness. Now, I’m not minimizing the loss of anyone, but we would be presumptuous to think that we can live forever and that the measures we take will allow us to cheat the inevitable.

For many, we feel neither safe nor happy while wearing masks. Breathing our own carbon dioxide is unnatural and many people feel panicky when wearing them, and free speech is at stake because people are literally muzzled.

There are times when masks are a safety hazard and even discriminatory and I want to give you some examples of that. One example would be the hearing-impaired. So, you have an exemption if you are hearing-impaired, and I understand you have an exemption if you’re talking to someone who is hearing-impaired, but how many of us know who is hearing-impaired just by looking at them? We don’t necessarily know. And, so, that can cause a safety hazard for those who are.

What about people who have English as a second language? I have a coworker who meets that description, and it’s hard enough to understand each other without a mask on. So, if you’re in a position where there is something that really needs to be communicated thoroughly and quickly and you’ve got English-language learners, that could be a problem, a safety hazard but it’s also a social hazard for them.

And, then, children, I want to address children. I am a certified teacher in the State of Kentucky with certifications in elementary and special education. I do teach and I also currently am a daycare director which recently reopened. Now, I think this mandate is a threat to the safety, for the emotional and physical health of children, and it is creating a generation and a society of germaphobes and hypochondriacs. For example, and I am not someone who goes around wearing masks or talking much about the safety of it around my three-year old, but she recently caught a cold and she said to me, it was because she didn’t wear a mask that she has the coronavirus. Now, she does not have coronavirus. She did not have coronavirus but there is a brain-washing that’s permeating our society about this and creating just fear.

So, a year ago, we went about our business with mild symptoms if we had some place to go or something we needed to do, but now we have to over-analyze every symptom, and this is creating in some ways a lack of a work ethic, I think, because we have to forego our work or whatever if we have a sniffle.

But when it comes to religious freedom, it also can be a hindrance to worshiping God freely. And if this is simply an attempt to gain control over people, then, it is religious discrimination as well.

Section 2 of the Bill of Rights says that absolute and arbitrary power is denied. Absolute and arbitrary power over the lives, liberty and property of free men exists nowhere in a Republic and not even in the largest majority. This mandate is absolute and arbitrary because it is a unilateral dictate of the Governor and is not enforced over certain groups of people, namely protesters. The Governor himself was photographed with his mask down shaking both hands of an elderly lady at a rally.

Now, Section 5 goes on to the right of religious freedom and it talks about

“the civil rights and privileges or capacities, that no person shall be taken away, or in any wise diminished or enlarged, on account of his belief or disbelief of any religious tenet, dogma or teaching. No human authority shall, in any case whatever, control or interfere with the rights of conscience.”

Constitution of the Commonwealth of Kentucky, Bill of Rights, Section 5

So, if I’m told to mask during singing at church, to social distance during church, these things are contrary to biblical teaching. We are told to lay hands on the sick, to greet each other and touch each other with affection and to sing. And if it goes against my religious conscience and beliefs to wear a mask and I have to wear one to receive the goods and services, this is a violation of conscience and my religious freedoms.

Section 26 of the Bill of Rights says,

“the general powers are to subordinate to the Bill of Rights and the laws contrary thereto are void. So, to guard against the transgression of the high powers which we have delegated, we declare that everything in this Bill of Rights is excepted out of the general powers of government, and shall forever remain inviolate; and all laws contrary thereto, or contrary to this Constitution, shall be void.”

Constitution of the Commonwealth of Kentucky, Bill of Rights, Section 2

So, if that is true, if all of the above is true and all of the things that we’ve said today, and I believe they are, these things can’t be changed according to our Bill of Rights and it is not to be altered without abolishing the government.

I would submit to you that the true pandemic we are facing is a pandemic of fear and control.

And while COVID-19 is causing sickness and even death, the death rate is low and the fear rate is astronomical. This is not about true health. It is about control, and we need not to submit to this and we need our Governor, our lawmakers and our Judges to adhere to the Constitution. Thank you. 

A Conflict of Liberty?

“Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.”

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Letter from Birmingham Jail

There is a divide in the church today. Unfortunately, this statement could likely be made at any time in history past, present, or future, until the Lord returns.

I just read an article about a local megachurch, in which they had taken a survey of their members. According to the pastor, there was about an equal split between members who believe they should meet in person immediately, those who think they should wait the situation out a little longer, and those who believe they should wait till there’s a cure or vaccine for COVID-19. Right after reading that, I read a post from a Christian leader who believes it’s cowardly for pastors not to immediately open, especially given that the President said he supports churches opening right away, even though some governors have kept them closed or placed lots of restrictions on them; she was discouraged that many pastors elected to remain closed.

Our small church did open today, allowing for following CDC recommendations, while not demanding churchgoers follow these protocols. We had some folks in attendance, as well as some watching online.

Christian seems to rise against Christian, some claiming we need to stand up for our rights, while others say that doing so violates Biblical principles. While I agree that the Bible trumps the Constitution, I also would posit that the Constitutional framers did so with Biblical principles in mind. Initially I asserted the view that we should lay down our First Amendment rights for the greater good of protecting our brother from harm; however, I’ve appreciated some contrary perspectives, and, while I don’t claim to have a perfect answer, I want to propose consideration of these thoughts:

  1. If someone slaps me on the right cheek, I can offer him the left; however, if someone slaps all of us on the right cheek, or if slapping me on the right cheek could lead to abuse of others, I should strongly consider standing up for our collective rights.
  2. I should examine my motives; if I’m driven by fear, greed, unrighteous anger, or any other sinful attitude, I should reconsider my position. Once my motives are pure, then I need to establish the best plan of action and follow it.
  3. What precedents are we setting by allowing our Constitutional rights to be infringed upon? How will our response impact future generations? We need to be wary of giving up rights that our God-fearing forefathers and generations of military members secured for us, many of them giving their lives, and all of them being willing to do so. More importantly, we need to prayerfully consider what is worth giving up the freedoms for which Christ set us free. We have been commanded not to be subject again to a yoke of slavery. The enemy of our souls can make a very convincing argument, and we need to be vigilant and discerning, lest we be led astray.
  4. What effect do our actions and inactions have on those who witness them? What will most glorify God to the watching world? There is a prevailing thought that Christians need to be compliant, docile, and unassuming at all times. Jesus called us to be peacemakers, not peacekeepers. Some people believe that, since Jesus was described as meek, we are not to assert ourselves. However, meekness isn’t weakness. Meekness is power under control, not a lack of power. Jesus stood up against oppression and injustice. He spoke out against the Pharisees, who placed unbearable yokes on others, and against the moneychangers, who took advantage of others. He did not gloss over sin, but lovingly confronted transgressors. Should we not follow in His steps?
  5. How has our culture shaped our view of what it means to be loving? Is being nice the same thing as being kind? In this era of political correctness, we have been brainwashed into trying to please everyone and to avoiding actions that may offend others. To love another means to want his or her best. I would never condone shaming someone who doesn’t feel comfortable returning to church, to work, or to society because they are in a high-risk group; we are called to prudence. However, if we give the impression that the only way to be loving is to watch church at home, to keep our businesses closed, to wear a mask everywhere, and to support the governing authorities’ every decision, we may not be giving the full picture. Isn’t it also loving to visit the sick (provided we are healthy and not caregivers for others in a high-risk group), to contribute to our neighbors’ livelihoods by utilizing their businesses, to contribute to society with meaningful work, to uphold truth, to confront error, and to preserve our countrymen’s God-given rights?
  6. Do our actions show favoritism to any person or group? It seems that we are listening to the counsel of some medical professionals but not others. There are plenty of solid medical personnel, some of whom use conventional medicine and others who use alternative methods, who say that the recommended measures are inaccurate and even counterproductive. Even though many are using recent data or reliable research to verify their stance, not only are they being discounted, many are effectively being silenced, because their recommendations don’t fit the prevailing narrative put forth by many in government and the mainstream media. We also seem to be showing favoritism to those vulnerable from a health standpoint, to the exclusion of those vulnerable from an economic or spiritual standpoint.
  7. What is the highest authority in our country or state? It is not the president or governor, and it definitely isn’t any worldwide organization or philanthropist. The Constitution guides our government, and the government is “by the people, of the people, and for the people.” Who are the people? The citizens of this country. When governors, presidents, legislators, or judges violate the Constitution, we need to question whether obedience is necessary. If we follow the Constitution, we are not breaking the law, even if we are told that we are.

Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter from Birmingham Jail, a masterpiece of logic, morality, and theological exposition, as applied to the issue of segregation is the source of the famous words, “injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.” Do you know the audience of this letter? Dr. King addressed this apologetic for “civil disobedience” to white pastors who thought he had gone too far by encouraging his followers to break the law. He echoed Augustine, saying that an “unjust law is no law at all.” He said that a just law is in harmony with moral law, that any law that degrades human personality is unjust. We must ask ourselves if quarantining the healthy is in harmony with moral law. We must consider whether destroying people’s livelihoods, keeping them from attending church, and imposing social isolation, especially in the midst of compelling evidence that this virus isn’t a serious threat to otherwise healthy people, is the correct coarse of action.

Pastors and other Christian leaders are called to be countercultural. We are to obey the authority placed over us, but in this country our highest authority is the Constitution, which was primarily written from a Biblical worldview. The Apostle Paul appealed to Caesar in the face of injustice; in America, the equivalent would be to appeal to the Constitution. Our Constitution says that nobody should prohibit the free exercise of religion, of speech, the press, or the right to peaceably assemble (Amendment I). Furthermore, “no State shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States; nor shall any State deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws” (Amendment XIV).

Some of you live in open states, and may wonder what all the fuss is about. Churches in Washington State and Minnesota have unjustly been kept from operating, and many still fear government reprisal. This morning, the Chicago mayor was reported to have sent police to shut down a church gathering in her city. Churches, daycares, and small businesses in Kentucky have far too many restrictions to practically operate. Everywhere the mainstream media mafia perpetuates fear and censors informed citizens in an attempt to control the narrative.

Christians, we must not be silent. Pastors, part of your calling is to admonish the flock according to Scripture and to equip us for participation in all spheres of life, including the media and the government. Please challenge us to speak into the culture, rather than to assimilate. Please give us permission not to be nice, but rather to be holy and effective at fulfilling the Great Commission and the Great Commandment. Please activate us in the spiritual war that has the whole world in its grip. Please don’t sit down and shut your doors. Please don’t bow to those who rule unjustly, no matter how “well-intentioned” they may seem. Please bow only to God, and refuse to allow His commands to be twisted into irrelevance.

In the words of Dr. King, “it is wrong to use immoral means to attain moral ends … it is just as wrong, or even more, to use moral means to preserve immoral ends.” Let us be neither complacent, nor arrogant. Let us not use our liberty as an excuse for sin, but also let us not be subject again to a yoke of slavery. We were bought with a price. It was for freedom that Christ set us free. Let us walk in that freedom, for the good of our country and our fellow countryman.